Athletic training combines the love of sports medicine as well as the science of exercise. The study of athletic training can lead to a career as a certified athletic trainer. Athletic training is not the same thing as personal training. Certified athletic trainers work in universities, high schools, professional sports, clinics, hospitals, performing arts, the military and other settings. The majority of certified athletic trainers go on to pursue a graduate degree.

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More About Athletic Training

Athletic Trainers help prevent and treat injuries for people of all ages. Their clients include everyone from professional athletes to industrial workers. Recognized by the American Medical Association as allied health professionals, athletic trainers specialize in the prevention, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. Athletic trainers are often one of the first heath care providers on the scene when injuries occur, and therefore must be able to recognize, evaluate, and assess injuries and provide immediate care when needed. They also are heavily involved in the rehabilitation and reconditioning of injuries.

Athletic trainers often help prevent injuries by advising on the proper use of equipment and applying protective or injury-preventive devices such as tape, bandages, and braces. Injury prevention also often includes educating people on what they should do to avoid putting themselves at risk for injuries. Athletic trainers should not be confused with fitness trainers or personal trainers, who are not health care workers, but rather train people to become physically fit. (Fitness workers are discussed elsewhere in theHandbook.)

Athletic trainers work under the supervision of a licensed physician, and in cooperation with other health care providers. The level of medical supervision varies, depending upon the setting. Some athletic trainers meet with the team physician or consulting physician once or twice a week; others interact with a physician every day. The extent of the supervision ranges from discussing specific injuries and treatment options with a physician to performing evaluations and treatments as directed by a physician.

Athletic trainers also may have administrative responsibilities. These may include regular meetings with an athletic director or other administrative officer to deal with budgets, purchasing, policy implementation, and other business-related issues.

Most athletic trainers work in full-time positions, and typically receive benefits. The salary of an athletic trainer depends on experience and job responsibilities, and varies by job setting.

Athletic training combines the love of sports medicine as well as the science of exercise. The study of athletic training can lead to a career as a certified athletic trainer. Athletic training is not the same thing as personal training. Certified athletic trainers work in universities, high schools, professional sports, clinics, hospitals, performing arts, the military and other settings. The majority of certified athletic trainers go on to pursue a master’s degree in nutrition and wellness.