For many, the study of history may seem like just fun thing to study while I college. Many see it simply as a prelude to becoming a lawyer, politician, or something else unrelated. For our purposes, the history channel of College Majors 101 is dedicated to those who want to make an entire career out of being an historian. There are many different avenues for historians, whether it is going to the Masters and PhD level and teaching in a university, or working for corporations like Coca Cola or Wells Fargo as their corporate historian.

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Why is this Important?

  • Watching videos on the subject helps you understand the true nature of the major
  • Viewing student work helps you see the quality and complexity of what you’ll study
  • Videos allow you to see facilities, and resources of schools that teach the major

More About History

Anthropologists study the origin and the physical, social, and cultural development and behavior of humans. They may examine the way of life, archaeological remains, language, or physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world. Some compare the customs, values, and social patterns of different cultures. Anthropologists usually concentrate in socio-cultural anthropology, linguistics, biophysical, or physical anthropology. Sociocultural anthropologists study the customs, cultures, and social lives of groups in settings that range from unindustrialized societies to modern urban centers. 

Historians research, analyze, and interpret the past. They use many sources of information in their research, including government and institutional records, newspapers and other periodicals, photographs, interviews, films, and unpublished manuscripts such as personal diaries and letters. Historians usually specialize in a country or region, a particular period, or a particular field, such as social, intellectual, cultural, political, or diplomatic history. Other historians help study and preserve archival materials, artifacts, and historic buildings and sites. 

Archaeologists examine and recover material evidence including the ruins of buildings, tools, pottery, and other objects remaining from past human cultures in order to determine the history, customs, and living habits of earlier civilizations. With continued technological advances making it increasingly possible to detect the presence of underground anomalies without digging archaeologists will be able to better target excavation sites. Another technological advancement is the use of geographic information systems (GIS) for tasks such as analyzing how environmental factors near a site may have affected the development of a society.

Archivists , curators, and museum technicians work for museums, governments, zoos, colleges and universities, corporations, and other institutions that require experts to preserve important records and artifacts. These workers preserve important objects and documents, including works of art, transcripts of meetings, photographs, coins and stamps, living and preserved plants and animals, and historic objects, including, for example, turn-of-the-century immigration records, buildings, and sites.